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Review: City Love

Photojournalists are not all professionals. They all have to start somewhere.

Sydney Cavanagh is a young photojournalist who blogs about her travels and pictures into a nicely written prose.

The work i am reviewing is City Love.

It documents her travel to the Big Apple, what she sees and feels at the time. Her images are wonderfully shot, just like any professional photographer, with objectivity and narrativity going through each of her pieces. It also contains timelessness in each, with a subtle emotion going through  making them stand out.

[Picture copyright of Sydney Canavagh]

A full display of her images can be viewed on shutterfly.

City Love portrays a love for a city that never sleeps, and her images portray it well. She picks up on the every day events and makes them unique. Giving them another meaning of strength.

As a whole, her blog shows how well she picks up on the natural events of life, showing others that you don’t have to be world famous photojournalist to get good images, but you just need the inspiration and will power to work towards a powerful picture.

The reason why photojournalists are even considered to be like journalists, is the fact that they do often make decisions instantly,  often while exposed to many significant obstacles such as physical danger, the weather and vast crowds.

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Focus: G.M.B. Akash

April 30, 2011 Leave a comment

“My fascination for the captured image was uncontainable and overcame everything — even my inexperience. Not knowing what I was doing or why, I went everywhere shooting anything and everything that caught my attention. The only thing I was certain of were the subjects I photographed. I concentrated on people living on the edge of society because their faces, lives, and living conditions held a particular fascination for me. Gradually I became absorbed in their daily lives for months on end, learning from their experiences. My desire to capture it all on film pushed me to go to places and to meet people I never would have encountered otherwise. Each visit gave me a deeper understanding of humanity.”

“Today, I count myself blessed, having become a photographer. To be able to articulate the experiences of the voiceless, to bring their identity to the forefront, gives meaning and purpose to my own life.”

“To me, photojournalism is a huge responsibility and a tough job. A photojournalist must be honest, hard worker, punctual, and he or she must respect other people.”

“This is not a job about making money or succeeding; it is about pursuing art, and opening people’s eyes. That is the responsibility of every photographer.

“With every picture you take, you enter a space that is unknown to you as a photographer. In the beginning it feels like forbidden territory, a place you are not supposed to enter surrounded by borders of privacy you are not supposed to cross. You, the photographer, are there at a factory, an old home or a brothel with your simple black bag hanging from your shoulder, eying everything around you as you are eyed by the people there.”

“It is challenging to work with so many international magazines. Bangladesh is not an internationally important country. I’ve met so many people who even don’t know where Bangladesh is. Magazines seem to only want photographs from Bangladesh when there are big floods or big disasters.”

Focus: Pablo Bartholomew

April 29, 2011 Leave a comment

Pablo Bartholomew has contributed greatly to photojournalism.

From the age of 19, he had won the first World Press Photo award for his work ‘Morphine Addicts in India’ (1975).

Even though he was quite young at the time, Bartholomew sees his as one of his greatest works, as he has a ‘fresh look’ and ‘less controlled‘ view of the world around him.

Since 1983, he has his works published in major news publications, such as Time, Newsweek, Paris Match and the Guardian.

Pablo Bartholomew had trained as a still photographer, in the cinema world, even in Bollywood. Bartholomew worked in those industries from the age of 15, as he was kicked out of school. So, Following what he had learnt from his father, he took his new found skills and improved them at the job.

” There was a kind of mystery in seeing the images that been taken a few days before, of landscapes or of the family forming on paper as if by magic, i suppose the magic of photography was embedded from there”. 

To this day, Pablo Bartholomew works as a photojournalist as well as working on his photography databases at netphotograph. He divides all of this with the added stress of commercial commisions.

“I followed all the big Indian stories but, much to my agency’s horror and anger, i’d take off for three or four months to go to very remote area”.  I guess this is why he has captured what others haven’t set foot into.

Here, is a brief look into the world of Bartholomew.

Pablo Bartholomew interview

The Start of Photojournalism

April 27, 2011 Leave a comment

In every news story, the image is a key element to give visuals on what they are reading about. To emerge the audience into the story, where words can not.

But pictures and photographs were not corporated into journalism at all. It was all about the written words. For example, The old established Times had pages covered in small fonted words, hardly without space.

It was not until Henri Cartier-Bresson, a French  painter who changed his interests to photography, who is considered to be the father of modern photojournalism.

Henri Cartier- Bresson had sought moments which he considered ‘decisive’ and captured them with his camera. One of those moments were ‘Military Appraisal at Moscow Trolley Stop’ (1954).

Behind this picture, Cartier-Bresson was preparing for a book record in Moscow, of the daily life of its population and this image contains many evidence. For instance, wires over the sky, and soldiers patrolling on the streets of a Soviet nation, with high polished boots and hats. Everything is uniformed and seems well engineered. This is what Lenin had wanted in the first place, to be the ‘engineer of souls’.

For more pictures, the Times website has a full photo essay on his works.